Appel à communications : Space, Place and Hybridity in National Imagination, UGA, ILCEA4

Space, Place and Hybridity in National Imagination (Colonial and Postcolonial English-speaking World, 18th – 21st century)

23-24 November 2017, Grenoble Alpes University, ILCEA4

The research group ILCEA4 is pleased to announce the organisation of an international conference on “Space, Place and Hybridity in National Imagination” to be held at Grenoble Alpes University. It proposes to examine the notion of hybridity or cross-fertilization in the highly controversial field of national identity–namely the spaces, figures and historical events that best symbolize it, as exemplified in the cultural productions originating from a nation or an ethnic or community group. The concept of “third space” as developed by Homi Bhabha in his seminal book The Location of Culture, is particularly productive in that it suggests a vision of space based not on confrontation, binary oppositions or antagonistic relationships of lordship and bondage, but on interactions involving exchange, transfer and mediation.

The conference shall examine the foundations of any “imagined community” (Benedict Anderson) and the ways in which artistic productions cause this set of images, values and references to evolve. These both reflect a history and a heritage but also expose their inherent limitations and underlying ideology, thus paving the way for the progressive transformation of such national figures, values and spatial representations.

All the elements pertaining to culture in a general sense and commonly considered as representative of national identity are within the scope of the symposium:

  • Iconography: flags, posters (nationalistic or otherwise), emblematic figures (specimens from the local flora and fauna for example), the representation of the national landscape in painting or photography, allegorical figures of the nation.
  • The short form as a medium for the national sentiment: national anthems, songs, poems.
  • Literature in a general sense: fiction, children’s and young adult literature, textbooks, political speeches, philosophical essays, history books.
  • Places, types of geographical spaces but also historical events crystallizing what the nation is supposed to represent (map making, memorial ceremonies, official events).
  • Cultural productions: film, dance, street art.

Every nation perceives itself as articulated around the concept of origin: a choice then emerges between a founding myth specific to it (a sort of self-generation devoid of any hybridity), and an impure, problematic genesis, born out of the contact with another cultural, historical and geographical sphere. Thus, within the British world itself, Scotland for example can be said to have been defined, both historically and culturally, in close relation to its rival and double, England. Similar considerations are relevant for Ireland and Wales.

More generally, former colonies of the British Crown have founded themselves in an ambiguous relationship to the “motherland” while trying to free themselves from its influence. After the colonial period, the goal was for the settler colonies (the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa) to found their identity antagonistically to that of the motherland, especially by focusing on their new land and the type of relationship they had with it so as to invest both with distinctive national characteristics.

An interesting and contentious point of study is the undeniably hybrid character of such early identity formations devoid of any cultural heritage or history except for those bequeathed by the motherland. Another essential and no less challenging issue is that of the relationship to the Indigenous populations of the colony whose culture and values, whose very existence sometimes, were voluntarily erased. The question of a possible hybridization between the culture of the colonizer and that of the colonized could be seen as a form of defilement, corruption or degeneration. Conversely, the appropriation and even the instrumentalization of symbols, places and values specific to Indigenous peoples in national mythologies is a highly controversial issue deserving careful scrutiny.

In what is commonly referred to as the “postcolonial” period, the discussion often centres on the denunciation or re-definition of national figures, symbols and places as well as the great texts and events constitutive of the core of a nation’s identity. Examining those shows how much they have evolved, across generations, through an underlying hybridization allowing greater representativeness, not only of the first inhabitants but also of new migrant communities or minority groups.

Space and place are not to be apprehended as exclusively geographical or referential but also as textual, thus enabling new hybrid subject positions within national mythologies. The rewriting or new adaptation of famous works into other forms (with generic, gender or modal variations) characteristic of the postmodern approach also allow the reevaluation of what constitutes the core of a nation’s identity, changing it into a field of experimentation and cross-fertilization. The contribution of historians, geographers, sociologists and semiologists will also enable the conference to examine the complexity and variety of the forms and functions of hybridity in national representations.

The deadline for proposals is 6 January 2017. Please send an abstract (max. 300 words) either in French or in English, and a short biographical note (max. 150 words) to both Christine Vandamme (christine.vandamme@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr) and Cyril Besson (cyril.besson@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr) by January 6, 2017. The notification of acceptance will be sent by February 10, 2017, at the latest. Selected papers will be considered for publication (in English).

 Bibliography:

Acheraïou, Amar. Questioning Hybridity, Postcolonialism and Globalization. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities. Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso, 1991.

Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin (eds.). The Empire Writes Back. London: Routledge, 1989.

Bhabha, Homi. Nation and Narration. London: Routledge, 1990.

Bhabha, Homi. The Location of Culture. London: Routledge, 1994.

Bakhtine, The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays. Edited by Michael Holquist; translated by Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. Austin: University of Texas Press, c1981, 1982 printing.

Brah, Avtar and Annie E. Coombes. Hybridity and its Discontents. Politics, Science, Culture. New York: Routledge, 2000.

Deleuze, Gilles. Mille Plateaux. Paris: Minuit, 1980.

Glissant, Edouard. Poétique de la relation. Paris: Gallimard, 1990.

Guignery, Vanessa, Catherine Pesso-Miquel and François Specq. Hybridity: Forms and Figures in Literature and the Visual Arts. Newcastle-upon-Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011.

Hall, Stewart. Questions of Cultural Identity. London: Sage, 1996.

Hogan, Patrick Colm. Understanding Nationalism: On Narrative, Cognitive Science and Identity. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2009.

Kuortti, Joel and Jopi Nyman (eds.). Reconstructing Hybridity: Post-colonial Studies in Transition. New York: Rodopi, 2007.

Moslund, Sten Pultz. Migration Literature and Hybridity: the Different Speeds of Transcultural Change. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

White, George. Nation, State, and Territory: Origins, Evolutions, and Relationships, Volume 1. Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield, 2004.

Young Robert, Colonial Desire: Hybridity in Theory, Culture and Race. London: Routledge, 1995.

 Scientific Committee :

Amar Acheraiou, independent scholar living in Canada and author of Questioning Hybridity, Postcolonialism and Globalization.

Susanne Berthier, professor, Grenoble Alpes University.

Cyril Besson, senior lecturer, Grenoble Alpes University.

Catherine Delmas, professor, Grenoble Alpes University.

André Dodeman, senior lecturer, Grenoble Alpes University.

Angela Giovanangeli, senior lecturer, University of Technology, Sydney.

Matthew Graves, senior lecturer, Aix-Marseille University.

Claire Maniez, professor, Grenoble Alpes University.

Claire Omhovere, professor, University of Montpellier 3.

Nancy Pedri, professor, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.

Gilles Teulié, professor, Aix-Marseille University.

Sandrine Tolazzi, senior lecturer, Grenoble Alpes University.

Christine Vandamme, senior lecturer, Grenoble Alpes University.

23-24 novembre 2017

Colloque international

Espace, territoire et hybridité dans l’imaginaire national (Monde anglophone colonial et postcolonial, XVIIIe – XXIe siècles)

Université Grenoble Alpes, ILCEA4

Le groupe de recherche ILCEA4 de l’Université Grenoble Alpes organise un colloque international portant sur l’importance des représentations spatiales et leur nécessaire hybridité dans l’imaginaire national. Cette conférence souhaite interroger la notion d’hybridité ou de fertilisation croisée dans le domaine hautement controversé de l’identité nationale et de ses espaces, figures et moments emblématiques tels qu’ils apparaissent dans les productions culturelles d’une nation ou d’un groupe identitaire. Le concept de « tiers espace » avancé par Homi Bhabha dans son ouvrage séminal The Location of Culture est particulièrement riche et fécond en ce qu’il propose une vision de l’espace qui évite la confrontation, l’opposition binaire ou encore le rapport dominant/ dominé et repose à l’inverse, sur l’échange, le transfert, la médiation.

L’objet du colloque sera d’interroger ce qui fonde, ce qui fait socle pour une « communauté imaginaire » (Benedict Anderson) et ce en quoi les productions artistiques font évoluer cet ensemble d’images, de valeurs et de références pour à la fois refléter une histoire, un héritage et en pointer du doigt les limites, l’idéologie sous-jacente, et par là-même, en esquisser la transformation.

On pourra s’interroger non seulement sur les espaces et territoires mais aussi sur tous les éléments de la culture au sens large représentatifs de l’identité nationale :

  • Iconographie : drapeaux, affiches populaires et nationalistes, recours à des motifs emblématiques (spécimens de la faune et de la flore locales), représentation picturale ou photographique du paysage national, figures allégoriques de la nation.
  • Formes brèves comme support du sentiment national : hymnes nationaux, chansons, poèmes.
  • Littérature au sens large : fiction, littérature de jeunesse, manuels scolaires, discours politiques, essais philosophiques, ouvrages historiques.
  • Espaces ou événements historiques cristallisant ce que la nation est censée représenter.
  • Productions artistiques : cinéma, danse, arts de la rue.

Dans un premier élan, toute nation se veut articulée autour du concept d’origine : s’offre alors l’alternative entre, d’une part, un mythe de fondation qui lui serait propre, sorte d’auto-engendrement vierge de toute hybridation et d’autre part, une genèse problématique, corrompue, qui se définit avant tout au contact d’une autre sphère culturelle et historique. Ainsi, au sein-même du monde britannique, l’Ecosse, par exemple, s’est-elle définie au cours de son histoire et de manière significative, par rapport à son rival et son double, l’Angleterre. Des problématiques similaires se posent également pour l’Irlande et le Pays de Galles.

Plus généralement, toute nation anciennement colonie de la couronne britannique tend à se fonder dans un rapport ambigu à la « mère-patrie », dont elle veut s’affranchir. Après la période coloniale, il s’agit pour les colonies de peuplement (États-Unis, Canada, Australie, Nouvelle-Zélande, Afrique du Sud) de définir leur identité en rupture par rapport à la métropole et notamment par le biais d’un fort investissement idéologique du territoire et du rapport à ce dernier. Il est intéressant de se pencher sur le caractère malgré tout hybride de telles formations identitaires de par l’absence de toute histoire, patrimoine ou héritage culturel mis à part ceux de la nation mère dont on veut se distinguer. Une autre question essentielle et tout aussi problématique se pose par rapport aux populations autochtones de la colonie dont on oblitère volontairement la culture et les valeurs, pour ne pas dire la simple présence – la question d’une hybridation entre culture du colon et culture du colonisé étant alors perçue comme possible souillure, corruption ou dégénérescence. Se pose aussi la question de l’appropriation, voire de la récupération de symboles, de lieux et de valeurs propres aux peuples autochtones.

Au cours de la période dite « postcoloniale », il est souvent question de la dénonciation et d’une nécessaire redéfinition des figures et symboles nationaux ou des grands textes et événements qui fondent le socle identitaire. S’interroger sur ces derniers montre à quel point ils ont évolué au fil des générations par une hybridation sous-jacente permettant une plus grande représentativité, non seulement des peuples premiers mais aussi de nouveaux arrivants ou encore de groupes minoritaires.

Espace et territoire ne sont pas à considérer sous un angle exclusivement géographique ou référentiel mais aussi textuel, permettant ainsi l’émergence de nouveaux positionnements au sein des mythologies nationales. Les réécritures, les nouvelles adaptations d’œuvres célèbres sous d’autres formes (passage d’un genre à un autre, d’un mode à un autre) qui caractérisent l’approche postmoderne permettent une telle réévaluation du socle identitaire et le transforment en un terrain d’expérimentation et de fertilisation croisée. Les contributions de collègues historiens, géographes, sociologues ou sémiologues pourront permettre d’élargir la réflexion sur la popularité de ce terme d’hybridité et sur la grande diversité de ses formes et fonctions.

Modalités de soumission

Les propositions de communications, en anglais ou en français (300 mots) ainsi qu’une courte présentation biographique (150 mots), sont à envoyer à Christine Vandamme (christine.vandamme@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr) et Cyril Besson (cyril.besson@univ-grenoble-alpes.fr) pour le 6 janvier 2017. Une réponse sera donnée le 10 février 2017 au plus tard. Une publication internationale en anglais d’une sélection des communications est prévue en 2018-2019.

Bibliographie

Acheraïou, Amar. Questioning Hybridity, Postcolonialism and Globalization. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities. Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso, 1991.

Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin (eds.). The Empire Writes Back. London: Routledge, 1989.

Bhabha, Homi. Nation and Narration. London: Routledge, 1990.

Bhabha, Homi. The Location of Culture. London: Routledge, 1994.

Bakhtin, Mikhail. The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays. Edited by Michael Holquist; translated by Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. Austin: University of Texas Press, c1981, 1982 printing.

Brah, Avtar and Annie E. Coombes. Hybridity and its Discontents. Politics, Science, Culture. New York: Routledge, 2000.

Deleuze, Gilles. Mille Plateaux. Paris: Minuit, 1980.

Glissant, Edouard. Poétique de la relation. Paris: Gallimard, 1990.

Guignery, Vanessa, Catherine Pesso-Miquel and François Specq. Hybridity: Forms and Figures in Literature and the Visual Arts. Newcastle-upon-Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2011.

Hall, Stewart. Questions of Cultural Identity. London: Sage, 1996.

Hogan, Patrick Colm. Understanding Nationalism: On Narrative, Cognitive Science and Identity. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2009.

Kuortti, Joel and Jopi Nyman (eds.). Reconstructing Hybridity: Post-colonial Studies in Transition. New York: Rodopi, 2007.

Moslund, Sten Pultz. Migration Literature and Hybridity: the Different Speeds of Transcultural Change. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

White, George. Nation, State, and Territory: Origins, Evolutions, and Relationships, Volume 1. Oxford: Rowman & Littlefield, 2004.

Young Robert, Colonial Desire: Hybridity in Theory, Culture and Race. London: Routledge, 1995.

Comité scientifique :

Amar Acheraiou, critique et éditeur indépendant, vivant au Canada et auteur de Questioning Hybridity, Postcolonialism and Globalization.

Susanne Berthier, professeur, Université Grenoble Alpes.

Cyril Besson, maître de conférences, Université Grenoble Alpes.

Catherine Delmas, professeur, Université Grenoble Alpes.

André Dodeman, maître de conférences, Université Grenoble Alpes.

Angela Giovanangeli, maître de conférences, University of Technology, Sydney.

Matthew Graves, maître de conférences, Université Aix-Marseille.

Claire Maniez, professeur, Université Grenoble Alpes.

Claire Omhovere, professeur, Université Paul Valéry-Montpellier.

Nancy Pedri, professeur, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada.

Gilles Teulié, professeur, Université Aix-Marseille.

Sandrine Tolazzi, maître de conférences, Université Grenoble Alpes.

Christine Vandamme, maître de conférences, Université Grenoble Alpes.